Book Review- Why Women Buy: How to Sell to the World’s Largest Market

 

 

This book was actually suggested to me on Audible. I am sure that I am confusing the robots in the sky by my varied purchases. I saw it then, with credits burning in my pocket, but discovered that the book was on pre-order and I added it to my wishlist long ago.

I thought because my Letters Never Meant to be Read was being largely bought by women, to my delight, that this book would give me some insight into that and help me with my Facebook and Amazon Ad copy.

Description:

Women drive 80% of consumer spending. The most powerful determining factor of how we see the world is GENDER. In today’s business market, women hold buying power of $4.4 trillion dollars, in the U.S. alone.

Mastering the skill to tap into the world’s largest buying segment will give you the competitive advantage you need. Dawn Jones shares 7 techniques for bridging the gap and capturing more business.

  1. Through scientific research, learn how women differ from men in the buying process.
  2. Overcome the fear of sales.
  3. Learn to operate with integrity.
  4. Learn to ask great questions.
  5. Integrate 4 communication styles.
  6. Learn to sell to 7 personality types.
  7. Master the four stages of competency.

Why Women Buy will equip you to stay ahead of your competition and master the art of selling to half the population.

 

What I Liked About this Book:

The first three chapters or so were great, exactly what I was looking for. It gave me some insight into retail buying behaviors of women and the idea that relationships and communication can have an impact on women’s’ purchases. I wanted some insight so that I could come up with better ad copy. This sort of helped, but with no real result.

There were some great discussions on social norms, biology, sociology, and psychology that could potentially help a marketeer in their pursuit of a target audience. In order to use this to your advantage, you must weed through the garden to find the gems of info.

The performance of the Audio book was awkward in parts but overall a great reading by author, coach, and entrepreneur Dawn Jones. I could listen to her voice for a long time. She does a great job at making a dry subject entertaining.

 

What I Didn’t Like About this Book:

By Chapter 4, this book drives toward direct sales or business to business marketing. I had flashbacks of my old roommate cold calling in the other room as he tried to sell magazine ads. Not really my cup of tea, and NOT what I was looking for in the slightest.

Indie booksellers ARE retailers. We often do this from a distance and our tactics are very different than that of a direct salesperson. An author must develop an elevator pitch but a lot of what is required involves copy: cover, back cover, book description, ads, promotional, etc. We try NOT to be pushy upfront with “Buy My Book!” and all that.

 

How This Effects My Writing:

I believe that I could listen to the first three chapters to give me at least a boost of confidence before writing copy which targets women readers on Facebook.

As for my fiction, not much. Reading is good for the soul in any manner. Listening to someone express their ideas with clear focus and direction is beneficial even if I don’t really dig the content.

 

3-Stars

 

If you are interested in direct sales and boardrooms, I recommend this book. This book is a little misleading in the ad copy, go figure.

I normally don’t review books that I don’t love, but it is on my summer list and I blew through this thing (only 3hrs and 53min) within a couple of days of driving. The overall performance and some information contained really saved this book.

 

Can you recommend any books to help with writing ad copy?

Please Comment Below.

Taking Back Control of My Twitter Account

Two years ago, I was a stupid writer who only wrote stories and refused to recognize the importance of my blog and social media in general. I have no time, or…I should be writing…It’s so impersonal…These are the common excuses.

My friend set up my Twitter Account (for a price). I was blogging on my own but sporadically, which didn’t make much of a difference except for my core supporters and family who would check in every once in a while.

When my good friend set up my Twitter account, he aimed to get me numbers. Not the kind of numbers I needed, but just followers.

Now, I see blogging and tweeting as fun and a value to my writing. I met some Amazing people on Twitter: A.M. Hounchell, who I am now writing a book with, Derek Murphy who I can’t stop watching on YouTube, Dave Chesson at Kindlepreneur, and A.Z. Anthony and Jo van Leerdam whose books I reviewed. Jo is sending me a signed poetry book from Australia! Among Many others…

I can pitch stories, do book reviews, and just talk about my two favorite activities, Reading and Writing.

It is such great practice as well and I can get a word count going and reach people in a meaningful way. Blogging has helped my writing because I am, well, writing more often and on various subjects. I can also talk about my work and pitch.

I can meet other indie authors too, buy their books, call for submissions, and just mingle with people who have the same goals. Some are further along, some are starting out like me.

Tweeting is fun too and has given me many exercises in marketing, micro poetry, books to read, memes to create, etc.

The problem was, I had too many people that I was following for no reason. This has given me less clout with my measly 2700+ followers (I thank you all) and has filled my news feed with so much stuff I don’t care about (politics) that it has been hard to decipher who I really want to interact with and re tweet.

I needed to take the plunge and do what several people have told me to do and use a Twitter Manager.

I first checked out Hootsuite because EVERYBODY says use Hootsuite. Too many features for me right now, and I would end up paying for features I would never use. I also checked out Meet Edgar, Post Planner, and Buffer.

For now, all I really want to do is manage Twitter and maybe Facebook, and be able to connect my blog.

So, I set upon the YouTube journey of discovery… 

 

I watched the following videos in this order:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Until I found Jerry Banfield’s video about ManageFlitter

Here Are the Features of ManageFlitter

Here is the Plans and Pricing

 

This video is long and he does repeat himself so I suggest you use the time markers in the description in order to jump to the info you want. 

 

 

You can try ManageFlitter for free without any effort (no forms or whatever) which I was pleasantly surprised about.

I started hacking at inactive followers right away. I then scheduled some Tweets which was a cool feeling since I do it haphazard or on the fly. I also found the best times to tweet out my info. I then connected my blog which would allow me to schedule tweets from my RSS feed, awesome.

A few months ago, I saw this as impersonal. Now, I realize that what I was doing was impersonal. I can engage with the people I actually want to.

I upgraded to a Pro account which is 12.99 for now, the other option is 49.99 with all the bells and whistles. You can also use Facebook and LinkedIn profiles with ManageFlitter.

What I wanted to achieve is three things:

  1. Unfollow in large quantities (ManageFlitter has many options for this, even large accounts).
  2. Find Out When the best time to schedule posts and do just that.
  3. Be able to Follow people I want to interact with and find them in an easy way (ManageFlitter makes it just as easy to follow in large amounts as unfollow).

 

More about this later, but I thought it was at least important to let you know how I spent my Sunday afternoon.

 

I am going to be checking out more of Jerry Banfield, his website and videos. He really has a lot to offer and I appreciate the info. I have queued up his video on SEO that I can’t wait to watch:

 

Stay Classy Authors and Poets.

 

What is your Favorite Social Media Managing App and HOW DO YOU USE IT?

Please share in the comments below.

Results of Amazon KDP Free Promo Days- A Case Study for Letters Never Meant to be Read

 

These are the results of a previous post where I outlined a multi-faceted marketing plan in order to jump start my Amazon KDP Select Free Promo Days- A Case Study for Letters Never Meant to be Read. 

My plan was based on the guidance and know-how of  Dave Chesson at kindlepreneur.com and listening to and exploring the world of Derek Murphy  on his YouTube channel and his website Creativindie.

If you missed my setup for this promo, please review the Case Study so the results make sense. There were several small tasks that I did to get ready for the marketing plan to make my page better, etc.

It’s always good to review the goals in order to gauge results:

KDP Select free days for Letters Never Meant to be Read were 4/21-4/25.

Goals: Garner more Reviews and Interest in the Project (Fans and Writers).

 

In the marketing plan, I spent 

Total KDP Free days Promoters: $165.99

Pre-KDP Free days FB ad: $80

Budgeted for FB and Amazon During and Post (5 days after) KDP free days: $200

Total for this promotion: $445.99 + Ongoing $75 Twitter campaign from yourbookpromoter which adjusted tweets for the KDP free days= $520.99

 

Starting Point. Here is the data on the Amazon rankings as of April 20, 2017, one day before the promo:

Author Rank: 157,720 (obscurity).

Letters Kindle Version: 389,652 (not even the top pages of my categories).

Letters Print Version: 188,476 (just OK)

 

Some Results:

Below are the results of the free books downloaded which equal 3,839 free downloads, 2.9K on the first day.

Campaign Results during

 

Interestingly, my Kindle Unlimited numbers weren’t too shabby either during this period with 821 KENP total:

 

KENP During

 

0 Paperbacks sold During this period.

 

Is this good? I don’t know what I would compare it with since Letters Never Meant to be Read is such a unique book.

What I do know is that nearly 4K readers decided to add it to their collection and this can’t be bad. Some of them may end up reading it on the beach this summer and review later, who knows? Thank you if you took a chance on us!

I also got #1 in my fav 2 categories which work best for this book:

 

More results: Now let’s see just what happened after. I can say that I made it as high as #32 in free in all of Amazon at one point.

 

Amazon Kindle Rank overall

 

We have been hovering between 25K-50K overall and never falling off the first page in my main category. Paperback sales have not been altered at all so I am not going to show the graph because it is sad.

 

Here is the after results for Kindle Units Sold since the promo. Nothing to write home about and I CERTAINLY will not get see any return on investment at this point:

 

After purchased units

 

Here is KENP after the promo:

KENP After

 

New Reviews Since Promo: 2 (Hopefully this will go up as people read what is on their virtual shelves).

Letters Received from New Writers for the Next Volume: 1 (The Best Number).

Author Rank Now: 34,290 (not as obscure).

Letters Kindle Version Rank: 54, 807 (WAS 24,227 yesterday).

Letters Print Version Now: 1,339,909 (insert sad-faced emoji here).

 

Well, Now What?

I would first like to thank everyone who paid attention to this case study and I’d love to hear about your results with your own projects as well.

I would also like to thank all of OUR new readers who are scoping this out right now at LaGuardia Airport or sitting by the pool on a cruise somewhere. The thought of them keeps me going.

Was it worth it? Sure, I suppose. I spent a lot of time and $500, but it’s always worth a shot. This is also part of a larger plan and experimentation. If I run this with the new Worked Stiff Book, I am bound to get wildly different results.

I also was not looking for a one shot wonder or anything. I wanted more reviews and more letters coming in. Those numbers are just not there yet but I know that it will take time.

My confidence in the Letters Project as a whole has not wavered.

I am disappointed that Worked Stiff: Short Stories to Tell Your Boss was delayed and I didn’t get it out during this promo which may have helped its initial sales.

I am running test Amazon ads right now which I will take a look at in another post.

Soon, I am going to go into a LESS MARKETING mode, just write, and get the next volume ready, the best marketing there is.

I am happy with the results in that  a decent number of people downloaded the book. I just hope 10% of them read it and review on the beach later this summer. That will give me a lot more juice when I run Facebook ads later.

Next time, I will break up my promo days into 3, then 2, something that Dave suggested.

Perhaps Dave and Derek can shed some light on these numbers so I can stop scratching my head like a weird dragon.

If I missed something here, please let me know.

If anyone else has any help, comments, or guidance, I am all ears and strawberry licorice.

 

forward-graphic-sig

 

Book Review: Mark Dawson’s Self Publishing Formula: Learn Amazon Ads

 

Ok. So I mainly run Facebook Ads for Letters Never Meant to be Read. The results of those among other marketing efforts will come out soon. But I wanted to get a handle on Amazon Ads, or Amazon Marketing Services (AMS) because I have spent $100 dollars and only sold one book with them (what???).

I know, right? Sad. Not entirely true because it seems that Kindle Unlimited Lending Library stats are not reported on AMS.

But still.

I scooped up this book free on Amazon thinking I would get a better understanding of how Amazon Ads work. The book opened with the logic that direct sales on Amazon itself would be more productive than any other platform. The customers are already there and are mostly ready to spend money. I knew this already.

What I liked about this book: 

One aspect of Amazon Ads that I did not understand for fiction writers is Targeting. AMS has an option for Automatic and Manual Targeting.

This is the part I was missing out on for the Letters Book. Although it is technically non-fiction, it is very important to do your own Manual Targeting and test those key words. You can use your own key words with a Cost Per Click adjustment as well as the suggested key words that Amazon lists for your book.

This suggests using authors and Google Adwords for Keyword planning.

Unfortunately, this is a two part deal. Not only do your keywords matter, but your ad copy matters too.

Test, Test, and more test. You must test the combination of keywords and ad copy to get the best conversion to sales. Expensive right?

Not really, the authors suggest a dollar a day on several campaigns. Once you find the right combination, pour money into that fire. The authors state that it is also difficult to get Amazon to spend your budget.

Also, the authors suggest “Most authors find that Product Display Adverts are not as effective for gaining sales…you will find that Sponsored Products are the simplest and most direct way…”

Choose Sponsored Products. I ran Product Display Ads one time, I don’t know what I was thinking.

 

What I didn’t like about this book:

Short much? Click bait in book form? Did this really take two authors to write?

Obviously, this is a link generating book with some insight and references to more knowledge but…necessary? No.

I didn’t even realize that I could have gotten this book, or some version, simply by giving one of my emails that I never check.

Luckily, it was free, but there is no way I would be happy if I spent a full 2.99 on this little gem.

Also, one of the authors references his guitar books and used those as examples of how to work the advertisements. I could have really used a little more help with using AMS to market fiction.

 

How this Changes My Marketing

Well, I did what the book said and I am now running 6 Amazon Ads. 3 for Letters Never Meant to be Read, 2 for Worked Stiff: Short Stories to Tell Your Boss, and one for Andrew Brechko’s Where Did You Go?: A 21st Century Guide to Finding Yourself Again.

I used 30 different keywords on each. Is that enough? No, probably not. When I ran a taxi company before, I had 750 keywords that I used in Google Adwords.

I’m sure there is more and better information out there. I will go on the hunt tomorrow for free info on the web, maybe even run across your blog, who knows?

3-Stars.

Scoop it up while it is free, read it in 30 minutes and adjust your ads accordingly.

Anybody run ads?

Anybody know of a better reference to Amazon or Facebook Ads out there? 

I could use the help, Please Comment below.